What’s In a Name? Part 2 Cow Killer

The name Cicada Killer doesn’t seem quite as scary as Cow Killer.  This stunning red and black Dasymutilla occidentalis is rumored to have a sting powerful enough to kill a cow.  It will not kill a cow, but hurts really bad for humans.  The above photo is a male and they lack  stingers.

The females are wingless and pack a potent sting.  I did not have that information on the morning I spent watching the drama of their lives play out.  The female is also call a Red Velvet Ant and she sure is pretty.  The female has a difficult journey.  While I watched, she was pursued by many suitors at once.  Her goal is to lay her eggs in the Cicada Killers Wasps’ tunnel.

Needless to say, the wasps were not welcoming.  It seems like a rough life for the Red Velvet Cow Killer, but as it turns out she has many defense mechanisms and is hardly ever eaten.  A study was done and 59 predators were given the chance to eat the Red Velvet Cow Killer and only two succeeded.  The Cow Killer is one tough lady and lives up to her name.


What’s In a Name? Part 1 Cicada Killer

These two inch long wasps are scary enough, but the name Cicada Killer makes one think twice about them. They have the less scary proper name of Drimipsis maculata. The giant wasp does kill cicadas, but otherwise ignores humans.  I must have dozens of them this year.  They fly close to the ground and I can stand among them as the large females circle around.

The calls from cicadas have lessened as the female Cicada Killers collect them to take into the 10 inch tunnels that are being dug in all my beds.  Meanwhile, the males fly around and spar with each other and mate with the females.

I have found many more of these sandy nests around the yard this year compared to previous years.  A few times I have seen a female go into a tunnel and once saw a wasp dive into the nest with a cicada which they lay their eggs on to feed their larva. While these wasps are pretty chill, I did see one chase a hummingbird away from her territory. Sadly, these big gals only live 60 to 75 days and their only goal in life is to reproduce.

I checked through my blog and realized I have posted quite a few times on these wasps.  Check out the links if you would like more information on these fascinating creatures.


Blue Velvet Wasp

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With the help of Shoreacres, Blue Velvet was identified as an Entypus Spider Wasp.  Many thanks!

Another update.  Theshrubqueen has added that the antennae color is a warning of toxicity.  More thanks!

This velvet blue creature with vibrant antenna has been flying around my property for several weeks.

It seems to just fly on some endless mission.

On one day I found the wasp hopping from leaf to leaf and was able to get a photo.  It didn’t seem to search for bugs or nectar. I have not been able to identify it and I’m just assuming it is a wasp. I looked through many photos on the internet and I signed up for inaturalist, but had issues getting the photo on the app. Please let me know if you can identify this velvet beauty.


Just Gingers

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Gingers have worked out really well in the Automatic Garden.  They are happy in the gumbo soil (heavy clay) and are troopers in the heat and cold.  Best of all, the plants reproduce on their own. When other flowers are taking their summer rest, Gingers really shine.

 

White Angel (Curcuma parviflora) is my most reliable bloomer and has never let me down in the many years it has graced the garden.  The original plant grows larger every year and has reproduced.

*Run your cursor over the photos for names or click to enlarge photos for the slide show.

 

 


Soft and Dreamy

The morning humidity on my lens gave the gingers a soft and dreamy focus.  It is a mishap that turned out well.

It looks even better in full size view.


Rainy Day

We have had several days of rain in the area and today was our big day.  So far we have had about 3 inches, but other parts of the city received at least 8 inches.  I went out to clear a clog.

We have a French drain that carries the rainwater across the yard, down a drain to a pipe and out to the street.  It doesn’t take much to clog it.

The birds were hungry on this wet day and while I was taking care of them, I noticed how pretty my gingers were glistening with rain.  The gingers are Hedychium coccineum.


Oxalis

The Automatic Garden always provides new plants, just not where I necessarily want them.  I found these Purple Oxalis Triangularis growing in the lawn that had somehow survived many mowings.

The closest Purple Oxalis is growing in pots on the back porch.  It is yet another plant mystery of how they ended up quite far from the pots.

I transplanted the newly found Oxalis to the colony that I started in the wooded area.  They don’t look so happy now, but the Purple Oxalis bloomed nicely in the early spring.  I have the plants protected by broken pots and bricks, as an armadillo has been plowing them up.  When the roots get a good grip or the armadillo moves, I’ll remove the barriers.


Snakes of the Good Kind and One Bad Kind

Spring brings many critters to the garden, which includes snakes.  I probably see more snakes in the Spring than any other time. I found a juvenile Rat Snake in the warm stones in the front yard. They eat rodents, lizards or toads, but will climb trees to eat eggs from bird nests.  I can always tell when the birds spot a Rat Snake, as they all gather and scream at it. This snake is not venomous to humans, but could bite and pass disease.

These two Ribbon Snakes have paired up for the season.  The large one has recently had a feeding. I came across her a few days later and got an eyeful of what exactly she likes to eat.  I’m not posting that photo.  These snakes are also called garden or green snakes. They are not venomous and eat garden pests.

And now the snake of the bad kind.  This is a Copperhead and helps by eating bugs and rodents, but is venomous to humans. Most people live after being bit.  This young snake was curled up in my planter. A reminder to look first. I have also found Copperheads to be mostly chill and like to watch whatever I’m doing.

(Sorry about the quality of these photos, as they were snapped quickly with my phone.)

Before I got around to posting this, the young Copperhead (I think it is the same one) decided to visit the back porch.  Naturally, it found a nice corner near the door my husband would be coming through soon. My husband, who is not into nature as much as I am, always has these snake encounters and this is the second time one waited for him at the garage door.

Copperheads have a very distinctive  Hershey Kiss pattern on their skin.

My tip for making snakes move without hurting them is to gently hose them with water or even throwing bowls of water on them.  Unfortunately, this youngster was a bit clueless, as many young are, and came towards me instead of away when I threw water on it.


Revealed

Two plants popped up in my small patio bed.  I wasn’t totally sure what they were so I let them grow out to reveal themselves.  I thought they might be weeds, Gulf Coast Penstemon or Cardinal Flower.  Once the plants grew to around 4 inches, it became clear they were Cardinal Flowers, which was my last guess.  I promptly dug them up and transplanted the pair to a better location.

More than once, I have mistook weeds for a wanted plant and let them grow.  And yes, there is a mix of weeds and seedlings in that bed.  I am waiting for them tell me what they are.


Attentive Gardening

With rain, you get Rain Lilies and this year’s display was spectacular. The couple of bulbs I bought years ago that just sat around doing nothing, have come alive and planted themselves all over the yard. (click on a photo for slideshow)

Aristolochia fimbriata, is the third kind of Dutchman’s Pipe that I grow.  It has tiny flowers and the nurseryman said it would attract butterflies.  I’ll wait and see.

I had to add another photo of the spiral ginger.  The flower is hidden behind the leaves and I enjoy peeking in everyday to see its progress.

My sweet little Peter Pan Agapnathus has made several flower heads this year.

 

After two years of hard winters, the Shell Ginger finally bloomed.

The African Blood Lily has done extremely well and seems to like our gumbo soil.  It makes huge blooms every year and has even multiplied. A mild winter and an attentive gardener (me staying home) has resulted in a late Spring full of blooms.