Blood Lily, Another Survivor

Continuing with plants that made it through the harsh weather this year, I was really pleased to see the Blood Lily back and blooming.

The Lily grows from a bulb and could have drown as it is growing in the good old Texas dirt, which is clay gumbo here.  The ground apparently stayed warm enough to keep the bulb from freezing.

For more information and better photos, go to my Blood Lily post.

 


They’re Back and Blooming

After a year of record breaking rain and freezing temperatures down to the teens, I was worried about my plants returning.  But, they’re back and bigger than ever.  I have been growing these reseeding Black Eyed Susan for many years and have never seen the flowers this large.

A seed from a Blanket Flower made its way across the driveway to grow in this crack.

It seems very happy against the hot wall and drive.

Speaking of hot,  Hot Lips is back.  It is Salvia microphylla.

The Mexican Hat returned. Being in a raised bed might have helped it survive the rains as they prefer drier soil.

One of my all time favorites, Balsam Impatiens, germinated from the seeds they dropped last year. Surprisingly, the seeds were not washed away.

These plants were grown by our founding fathers.

The Tickseed (Coreopsis lanceolata), managed to reseed a plant or two.

Even though the Butterfly Weed froze to the ground, the roots survived and it is ready for the Monarchs to visit.

A Five Lined Skink photo bombed the shoot.

Although most of the plants survived, there is always room for something new.  I added this Bat Faced Cuphea, but expected it to be red and dark purple, but it is pretty anyway.

Another new addition is this petunia that just showed up in a front yard bed.  I know I grew some several years ago.  Did the seed survive or blow in from a neighbor?  I will enjoy it while it’s here.

My winter anxiety has finally been relieved by seeing new blooms everyday. The Automatic Garden survived.

 


Mystery Solved…Mostly

During the winter a plant with large leaves sprouted in the garden.  I had no idea what it was, as I had planted a variety of annuals there to provide blooms for hummingbirds and butterflies and I wasn’t sure if it was one of them. The plant froze back twice during the winter and I never thought I would find out what it was. Finally, it revealed itself as an Ageratum.

I had originally planted these sweet little Ageratum that are tumbling down the rocks and now this really big one has appeared.  So I am asking the experts out there to explain this.  I think it is a throwback to its original form, before being miniaturized. I do have a Wild Ageratum (Mistflower) in the yard, but this is not the same.


The Babies Have Arrived and Other Lunchtime Amusements

While eating my lunch, I noticed some activity outside my kitchen window.

Baby Cardinals just out of the nest were having a nice mud bath in my flower bed.

Dad was keeping a watchful eye on the kids.

As soon as Cardinal family left, this Green Anole hopped on the sill to do some bug hunting on my window.

Yup, I know that window needs to be cleaned, it always does.

All the photos were taken through the kitchen window.  I planted the bed with flowering plants that attract all kinds of backyard critters and there’s a feeder for Hummingbirds.  I am always entertained while I dine.


The Corn Field

Well, really my Ginger collection.  It does look a lot like corn and a gardening friend told me a funny story about her daughter who was getting married in her mother’s backyard.  The daughter stated that she did not want to be married by her mom’s corn field.  The mother knew, of course, that the Gingers would be full of beautiful white blooms with a heavenly scent for the wedding.  After her wedding day, the daughter changed her opinion on her mother’s corn field.

 

 

 


The Inside Type

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Last year my eye caught this beautiful Rex Begonia at the local plant store.  It cost much more than I wanted to pay, but I needed something bright and colorful for shade.  I took one home for a test drive to see if the rabbit would eat it before I purchased more.  The Begonia passed the rabbit test.  I headed back to the store to find that others were willing to pay the high price and all the Begonias were gone.

Usually plants enjoy being planted in the ground, but this Begonia did not flourish, so I put it in a pot.  It did alright, but it was not thriving.  Winter came and the Rex Begonia was put in the garage in front of the only window for the winter.

Well, all I can say is that some are the indoor type. The Begonia spent the winter growing,  in what I thought were not ideal conditions, and filled the pot.  Who knew?

Now it is back outside on the covered porch basking in the afternoon sunlight.


A Keeper

Last year I needed something white to fill in my bed of mainly white flowers.  I found this Polka Dot plant (Hypoestes phyllostachya), which I always thought of as a house plant.  It did well outside in the bed until we were hit with a very hard freeze.  Of course I thought, that is that.  But to my surprise the Polka Dot started growing new leaves in the Spring.

And to top that, it reseeded and grew the cutest little babies with Polka Dots on its second set of leaves.  This Hypoestes fits all the criteria for my gardening philosophy and is a keeper for the Automatic Garden.