A Sunny Day

Just a few days ago, we had perfect weather with the temperatures in the 80’s and low humidity.  I took advantage of the warming sun and just sat near a flower bed.  And I wasn’t the only one. The blooms were covered with all kinds of pollinators.  I managed to photograph a few.

The American White Pelicans were flying against the clear blue sky and some small flocks of visiting birds were poking around looking for bugs. One little bird, a Ruby Crowned Kinglet, didn’t seem to mind me sitting there and came very close.

Since that sunny day, our winter has returned with heavy rain and cold temperatures.  But as it always happens in these parts, the weather is about to change and a great weekend is promised.

 


November Wildlife

I always love the visiting wildlife in the yard.  This day started with a rabbit waiting on his breakfast.

One sign of Fall is the arrival of the American White Pelicans.  Every morning they take a long lazy flight.

A very unexpected visitor was this Tersa Sphinx Moth.  I was weeding and when I brought my hand out of the plants, the moth was attached to my glove.

Take a close look at this photo to see the pine cones that were eaten by the squirrels.  The ground was covered with the scales after the seeds were eaten.  The squirrels had quite the feast, as a large area was littered with pine cone remains.

 


Weather

A local meteorologist posted this last week.  It doesn’t mention the nearly 7 inches of rain for the month. Our plants have to be Texas Tough.


Autumn’s Confederate Rose

****************

Every Autumn I look forward to my Confederate Rose blooming. It is actually a Hibiscus mutabilis that is originally from China. A cutting can easily be started and that is why it has been a great passalong plant in the South. It is a gangly small tree that is unattractive most of the year, until the big payoff in the Fall.  This has been a particularly good year and every bud has opened.  Each cluster has 5 to 7 buds providing a spectacular display which has been going on for 3 weeks with more to come.

The flowers open pure white in the morning.

In the afternoon, they begin turning pink.

Evening brings a dark rose color to the flowers.

By the end of the day, the Confederate Rose has turned to the colors of a rosy sunset.

 


Dressed for Halloween

Happy Halloween!


Pot O’ Volunteers

The black pot had been sitting in a bed in the front yard for several years.  Its purpose was to hold the Golden Dewdrop Duranta (the tallest plant).  Over time some, volunteers decided the large pot would be a great place to grow. White Penta and Abelmoschus Moschatus seeds dropped in. Even the Passion Flower is attracted to the pot.  Luckily for them, I love volunteers and the plants have a happy place to grow.

Another volunteer that I am thrilled with is the Wishbone Flower (Torenia fournieri).  Its tiny seed is able to lie low all winter and germinate when the temperature rises.  Its nickname is Summer Pansy, as it is too hot to have real pansies here in the summer.

Shortly after photographing the pot full of volunteers, I came across another Abelmoschus volunteer growing in the cobble rocks.  It was quickly moved to a bed.  Volunteers are a great way to keep the garden full.


A Sunny Flower For a Rainy Day

The Mexican Sunflower, Tithonia was a happy beacon on a cloudy day. The bright orange flower was extra shiny after a rain shower.  The Tithonia is native to Central America and Mexico and is also called the Golden Flower of the Incas, Tree Marigold and Red Torch.