A Texas Tradition

It is that time of year when every Texan heads out to hunt for Bluebonnets.  It becomes pandemonium along the highways as everyone stops their cars and jumps into the fields to make a picture.

We found a beautiful field full of blue on a road away from the busy highway.  You can see how big the field is by the people off in the distance. Kids, dogs and adults were being photographed to preserve a perfect day with our beloved state flowers.


The Hungry Hummer

 

I recently found a use for the slo-mo option on my cell phone.  I have been watching the honey bees empty out the hummingbird feeders and I thought it would be fun to capture them in slow motion.

I situated myself really close, about 12 inches away.  The bees actually hit me a few times, but I wasn’t worried as they were so hungry and only focused on feeding.

As it turned out, someone else was hungry and the Buff-bellied Hummingbird flew into the shot and fed while I was that close!  Enjoy the video.  It can be enlarged.

Hungry Hummingbird from Automatic Gardener on Vimeo.


Cedar Waxwings

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Timing is everything.  As I was preparing my posts on Holly Trees, the Cedar Waxwings arrived to feast on the berries.  I was alerted of the birds presence by my resident birds.  The Cardinals, Titmice, Chickadees and Carolina Wrens gathered to check out the visitors.  (click to enlarge)

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Luckily, the birds stayed long enough that I could get the camera and switch lenses.  Waxwings fly off at the slightest disturbance.  The photos are highly cropped as it was hard to get very close.

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I was very pleased to get an almost perfect shot of this beautiful Cedar Waxwing.


Becoming a Wildlife Photographer

 

I thought I would take the plunge and become a wildlife photographer (joking..kinda).  I really wanted to capture my winter Hummingbirds, so I dug out a tripod, put on the long lens and situated a chair with a good view. I sat for awhile and they did not show up.  Being in the yard, I started thinking about gardening chores and decided to get to work.  With that done I came back to the chair to wait again.  The birds still were not hungry, so I went inside to check on dinner.  I headed back out and was finally rewarded.

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I was able to get a decent shot of the Buff-bellied Hummingbird that has been around since Thanksgiving.  I have a photo of him through a window, but this is outside and clearer.  He is tolerating my presence more.  I have enjoyed watching him take showers in gentle rains and baths on the Variegated Ginger and Philodendron leaves.

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This little guy arrived around Christmas.  He is a Rufous Hummingbird and hails from the far northwest.  His color indicates a male.  He is very stealth during feeding and is able to zoom in when the big Buff-bellied is elsewhere.  He drinks for quite awhile, filling up in one visit.

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As far as a career as a wildlife photographer, I think not!  I don’t have the patience to sit for long periods of time, but I certainly admire those who do and produce the wonderful photos for us to enjoy.  I will just go back to getting lucky with a camera in the right place at the right time.

 


Bees, Butterflies and Hummingbirds

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Our record breaking Christmas heatwave has encouraged flora and fauna to emerge from their winter rests.  The bees are finishing off a feeder a day.

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Butterflies are feasting on the last of the summer flowers.

Caterpillar eggs are hatching and thankfully the Passion Flower has replenished its leaves for the babies.

Azaleas that are supposed to bloom in March are beginning to open.  A Gardenia has also popped out.

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The Buff-bellied hummingbird is still hanging out in the yard, but is now also using the feeder as the flowers dwindle.  The weather forecast is showing temperatures dropping down to our normal “warm” winter weather with no freezes for awhile.

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My post Christmas plans are to clean out some beds and plant winter annuals while the weather is nice.


Seeking Heat

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A Norther blew in and the temperatures dropped into the 30F’s.  I was surprised to see this very fat Skink sunning itself in the corner of the garage. They are usually not seen this time of year.

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A Buff-bellied  hummingbird appeared in the garden just after Thanksgiving.  The bird was not enjoying the cold and the chill slowed down the very active hummer long enough to snap a photo through the kitchen window.

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The Buff-bellied is about 4 inches in length, which makes it a big hummingbird in this area.  It has beautiful dark green and buff feathers when lit by the sun.  Enlarge the photos see the colors better.  The last time one visited the garden was the summer of Hurricane Ike.  The small bird rode out the storm and was feeding the next day.

But never mind about the weather as they say down here, just wait a minute and it will change.  The wind has shifted and is blowing  from the Gulf bringing the temperature up 30F degrees and summer will be here later in the week as the mercury hits 76F.


Mourning Dove

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Doves have never been a favorite bird of mine.  I don’t like the sounds they make and they sit in the feeder leaving droppings, not politely hanging their tails over the edge as the other birds do.

But while testing out a lens for my camera, I took a photo of a Mourning Dove and blew it up for a closer look.  I was surprised to see the blue ring around its eye which also continued on the beak.  The Dove’s wings also look shimmery in the photo.

I did some research to find out that Mourning Doves are monogamous and both parents care for their young.  They can have up to six broods of two a year.  Maybe after a closer look, I will think of them more kindly.