Camellias, the Jewels of Winter

 

As snows blow across the northern parts of the country, Camellias begin blooming here October through March, catching the eye like beautiful jewels.

dsc_0589

This gorgeous huge flower is from the Royal Velvet Camellia.  It has had a rough start, as during its second year in the natural part of the yard, deer decided to taste it.  This year the Royal Velvet was able to put out quite a few 5 inch flowers.

dsc_0597

Shi-Shi Gashira is a tough little gal.  These Camellias are planted in full sun and have never disappointed with their abundance of blooms.  The Camellia has been covered in snow, taken heavy rains, drought and recently frozen.  The photo is of a bloom that was in bud during our recent heavy freeze.

dsc_0624Professor Sargent is new to the garden and I am very pleased with it.  The Camellia is covered with blooms up to 3 inches across and the shrub can reach a height of 8 feet.  Camellias are generally very slow growers, so it may be years before it gets that large.

dsc_0630

One of the oldest Camellias in the garden is White By the Gate.  It has been a reliable bloomer over the past 15 years.  This photo was taken against a cloudy sky.  The shrub has been making blooms in triplet. Notice the half open bloom and a bud behind the flower.

dsc_0653

As a test, I sent this photo to some friends to identify it.  They all guessed it was a rose. But no, it is Southern Secret Camellia.

dsc_0658

Southern Secret Camellia is new to the garden this year.  I purchased two of them to replace roses that died, probably due to the increasing shade from the native trees on the property.  Camellias grow well in shade and also enjoy the acidic soil in this area.  Pine needles are their friend.  So many needles drop from the trees, that I often have pick them off of the flowers before I photograph them.

dsc_0679

These Camellias with their 5 inch flowers should be stunning as they grow up to 10 feet tall.   They are planted along the back fence and can be seen from my kitchen window.  These beautiful Camellia jewels brighten the winter months.


Finally

DSC_0038

Finally, some blooms in the garden.  The few days of freezing temperatures halted the usual winter flowers.  On the bright side, this White by the Gate Camellia is spectacular this year.  The cold and lack of rain prevented the usual growth of fungus on the flowers.

DSC_0043

White flowers seem to be the first to bloom. Southern snow?  The Paperwhites may also have enjoyed the cold.

DSC_0059

The Snowdrop is a reliable bloomer here.  The green dots on the edges are so sweet.

DSC_0065

Bees have been getting their food from the hummingbird feeder, as not many flowers are blooming.  The Hummingbird is quite upset about this and flies from feeder to feeder trying to chase them away.  The bees won’t budge!

DSC_0069

This Red Velvet Camellia is the only color in the garden at the moment.


Camellias

DSC_0208

DSC_0662

DSC_0535

DSC_0673

DSC_0151_edited-1

DSC_0387

DSC_0491

DSC_0501

Camellias are the gems of the garden in the fall and winter along the Gulf Coast.  The first two shown are Sasanqua type that start to bloom at the end of October.  The ShiShi Gashira are the next two photos and begin opening in December.  Around January the Japonica varieties continue the show with multi-petaled flowers.  In the Automatic Garden the winter ends with the pristine White by the Gate and Red Velvet Camellias.