November Pinks

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Pink is not usually a color associated with November and I was surprised to see how many pinks were in bloom this month.  The garden favorite, Confederate Rose, begins the show.  She only blooms in the fall.

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Wendy’s Wish salvia will bloom in the spring, but it does bloom nicely in the fall and into the winter if the weather stays mild.

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Pam’s Pink Turks Cap has continued blooming from late summer.

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Camellias begin their bloom time in the fall.  This one starts by Halloween.

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Ancore Azaleas bloom on and off all year-round.

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The Japanese Anemone is beginning to wind down after a couple of months of blooming.

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The cutest little pom-poms develop on the Mexican Knot Weed.

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This pink Wishbone had reseeded from last year’s plant.

 

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Believe it or not, no pink Pentas were ever planted in the garden.  There are white and red Pentas.  Maybe they got together.

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The Pink Salvia has been with me for a long time.  Many years ago, a neighbor let me dig it up from her garden.  I have moved since then and so has she.

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Even though this is named Pink Flamingo Feather Celosia, it looks a tad purplish.

 

 


Fall Bloomers

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Swamp Sunflower (Helianthus angustifolius).  This bright bloomer started right at the beginning of fall to the delight of the bees.  As its name implies, it likes a moist area.  It grows up to 6 feet tall and is a prolific reseeder.

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This Pam’s Pink Turks Cap desperately needed a trimming, but thankfully it was too hot to do the job and now it is loaded with flowers and buds.

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White Rain Lilies (Zephyranthes candida) pop up every year around this time and each year there are more of them.  They are in the amaryllis  family and can be separated and moved to new beds or shared with gardening friends.  Wild ones grow around this area and they have a scent.

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This Blue Salvia, the name has been lost, is always a reliable bloomer just when the butterflies and hummingbirds stop by on their journeys south.

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This Red Salvia is just super, blooming in the spring and fall.  It takes a break during summer.

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Coleus Flowers are not very exciting, but the bees sure do like them.  All of the Coleus were started by cuttings.  It is just about time to start some for the winter.  They do well in a sunny window and can be returned to the outdoors when the weather warms up.

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Torenias (Torenia fournieri) has many names.  Wishbone because of its stamens form a wishbone shape.  It is also called Clown Flower, Summer pansy (we grow pansies in the winter here) and Bluewing.  What ever you call it, it is a great little plant that takes partial shade and reseeds in the Automatic Garden.


Fuel …just in time for fall migration

Pentas ((Pentas lanceolata)  had a lazy summer, but perked up for fall.

Wild ageratum (Eupatorium coelestinum) planted itself in the garden and is now in full bloom.

Firecracker (Russelia equisetiformis)  growing in a pot low to the ground doesn’t stop hummers from visiting.

Butterfly Weed (Asclepias tuberosa) is blooming in time for Monarchs and hummingbirds.

Cigar plant (Cuphea micropetala) is hugely attractive to hummingbirds.

Pam’s Pink turk’s cap provides plenty of fuel.

Hummingbird Bush (Hamelia patens) is the number one favorite of hummingbirds.

Salvias. Bees need fuel too.

Weeping Bottlebrush (Callistemon viminalis) This tree just re-bloomed and is buzzing with hummers.

A hummingbird sitting still for a moment.

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Fall is a great time of the year to be on the Gulf Coast. Hummingbirds and Monarch butterflies are passing through on their way to warmer winters.  Today the garden was humming with six little Ruby Throats vying for fuel for the long trip ahead.  Nature is in sync with the migration as many flowers re-bloom for the season.