Cheery Blooms

This time of year it is hard to tell if it is late winter or early spring.  The temperatures are going from 80’s to 30’s depending on the day. Thankfully, there are some blooming plants cheering up the season. The Nasturtiums, started from seed, have done really well in the strawberry pot and can be viewed from my kitchen window.

The Purple Oxalis Triangularis prefers to bloom on cool days and takes its rest in the summer.

Kalanchoe’s electric colors joins the other two potted plants on the patio to brighten up the day.

I bought these Ageratums one deary flowerless winter and have been surprised that they keep coming back.  They start putting out growth in the fall.  I didn’t bother to learn what kind they were, as I thought they were annuals and would die.  They are reproducing on their own and maybe I’ll eventually have a bed full of them.

Firespike, Odontonema strictum, is another passalong that grows really well.  I did some gardening no-no’s and threw some cuttings around my wooded area and they rooted.  Now I have several clumps around the yard.  They do attract my winter hummingbirds and add color to the season.

Kalanchoe daigremontiana or Mother of Thousands, probably Mother of Millions, really put on  a show this year.  Mother can grow in just a bit of soil and reproduces like crazy.  I pull up hundreds or thousands every year. It is from another part of the world and likes to bloom in the winter.  This year with no freezes, the plant reached its potential. There are 13 flower heads blooming. Its unusual flowers with many subtle  shades of color is what makes me keep it around.


Sweet and Petite

Early Springs brings very sweet and petite flowers that are one time bloomers.  The Purple Oxalis has been joined by a white one that is sold here as Shamrocks for St. Patrick’s Day.

Violets bring back childhood memories of my siblings and me picking as many of them as we could from the yard before it was time to mow the grass.

This Ageratum doesn’t seem to mind the cold and has been growing new leaves and buds through the winter.

The Crocosmia took a rest last year and did not make any flowers.  This year a few are coming.

This darling little white flower is a bit of a mystery.  I must have gotten it at a plant exchange and was told it was a ground poppy.  I cannot find any information on it and maybe someone will recognize it.  The leaves emerge in late winter and the plant has multiplied, but seems to move all over the bed.  When the summer heats up, the plant disappears.  None the less, it is a welcome sign of Spring.

If anyone wants to try to identify this, here is a photo with the leaves.


Mystery Solved…Mostly

During the winter a plant with large leaves sprouted in the garden.  I had no idea what it was, as I had planted a variety of annuals there to provide blooms for hummingbirds and butterflies and I wasn’t sure if it was one of them. The plant froze back twice during the winter and I never thought I would find out what it was. Finally, it revealed itself as an Ageratum.

I had originally planted these sweet little Ageratum that are tumbling down the rocks and now this really big one has appeared.  So I am asking the experts out there to explain this.  I think it is a throwback to its original form, before being miniaturized. I do have a Wild Ageratum (Mistflower) in the yard, but this is not the same.